NEWS | Oct. 9, 2020

Deputy ASN for Safety Launches Webinar Series

By Becky Coleman, Naval Safety Center Safety Promotions

The Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy (DASN) for Safety has launched a new online safety awareness initiative aimed at increasing collaboration and information sharing amongst Sailors, Marines and civilian employees in the Department of the Navy.

More than 65 participants signed on to the webinar series’ first session, “Updates, Insights and Best Practices from across the Department of the Navy,” Sept. 24, and feedback revealed the information provided helps them professionally.

The first session focused on COVID 19 reporting and updates on SECNAVINST 5100.10L, Department of the Navy Safety Program, and medical surveillance programs.

“This forum is going to be very useful,” said Kirsten Lucchetti, safety officer, Navy Medical Readiness Training Command New England, Newport, R.I. “The first session addressed relevant topics that personnel have witnessed first-hand. This webinar series facilitates open and frank conversations within the community, which allows personnel to bring up any weaknesses they’re witnessing. We have a structured means to speak up – because if you have a question, you can bet that someone else also has the same question.

“I encourage everyone in the group to share information, checklists, standard operating procedures and lessons learned because it is only going to make us better professionals,” she added. “There are a lot of people out there doing good things and now we will get to hear about it and share resources through this communication tool.”

“Establishing this series is the next evolutionary step in the maturation of the Department of the Navy’s Safety and Occupational Health (SOH) program,” said Anthony Militello, director, Occupational Safety and Health, ODASN (Safety).

Militello said the webinar’s intent is to exchange current DON SOH program updates, initiatives and best practices with Navy and Marine Corps safety and public safety professionals across all communities – ashore, afloat, aviation, expeditionary – military and civilian.

“We see this as a galvanizing instrument; one that actively engages our community and advances the goals of the DON’s safety awareness campaign,” he said. The webinar’s Adobe Connect platform will hold up to 500 participants, “so there is plenty of room for this open invitation event and no one should consider themselves excluded from attending.

“Individuals can also submit questions to dasnsafety@navy.mil and they will be researched and addressed during the webinar or directly to the individual.
“We want this to be a forum for frank and candid conversation,” said Militello. “Participants will have the opportunity to exchange ideas, best practices and ask questions on safety-related topics impacting them now.”

Each month will feature new topics that are current and relevant. The intent is to hold the webinar on the fourth Thursday of each month.

Lucchetti said, “This initiative will provide an easily accessible platform for all Navy and Marine Corps commands to receive the most up-to-date information on safety programs, initiatives, and best practices. A critical part of this initiative is it provides a safe space for personnel, regardless of rank or title, to have a voice and to be heard. I am incredibly impressed by leadership’s commitment and personnel involvement that I have seen. It is bound to influence commands and create a robust safety culture throughout the Navy.”

The next session takes place Oct. 22, 1-2 p.m. EST. People can sign on at https://navsafetc.adobeconnect.com/don. The scheduled presenter is the commander, Fleet Readiness Centers.

All sessions are recorded and available for viewing afterward at the following link, https://www.secnav.navy.mil/eie/pages/safety.aspx.

“Safety is relevant, and it’s imperative that professionals have the ability to adapt quickly to new and changing hazards and help to mitigate risks,” added Lucchetti. “The tools and information that DASN provides are essential to educating safety professionals and the lessons learned are valuable so history does not repeat itself.”